Thursday, 21 March 2013

Pagans and Pilgrims: Glastonbury, Hills and Yews

I've just watched this week's Pagans and Pilgrims on BBC Four, and I thought it was the most interesting episode in the series so far.

It started off looking at Glastonbury, particularly the Tor, which I visited myself quite recently. Then there was an interview with Druid Philip Carr-Gomm about why churches are often built on ancient pagan sites. After that, presenter Ifor ap Glyn examined the sacred nature of yew trees. Finally, he considered how hills and mountains are considered sacred places by both Christians and pagans.

Pagans and Pilgrims is available on iPlayer and you can find out more about the episode here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01r6z2d

Previous related posts
http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2013/03/tv-pagans-and-pilgrims-britains-holiest.html
http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2013/01/glastonbury-tor-entrance-to-land-of.html
http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2013/01/pagan-eye-glastonbury-thorn-tree.html
http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2012/11/book-review-god-tree-by-janis-fry.html
http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2013/03/hot-tubs-naked-witches-and-ritual.html

5 comments:

CaroS said...

I had great hopes for this series, but I'm getting pretty fed up about the constant referals to "pagan evil", and the conflating of Cernunnos and the devil.

CaroS said...

I had great hopes for this series, but I'm getting pretty fed up about the constant referals to "pagan evil", and the conflating of Cernunnos and the devil.

badwitch said...

CaroS - I do agree with you. The constant insinuation that Christianity is better than paganism is a bit irritating. However, I'm still finding the series interesting.

chilledchimp said...

This was more interesting than the previous episodes, but I had high hopes for this series that haven't quite been met. Re. his point that Christianity colonised former pagan sites. This view has been around a long time but Ronald Hutton has suggested it's not as common as has been thought.

badwitch said...

I agree the title implied it would be more about paganism than it is, and it isn't really saying anything that those with a reasonable knowledge of pagan history don't know already. Mind you, I have never before seen that church in the henge with the two yew trees and it looked worth visiting.